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Dr. Dennis Schmipf interviews with The Lynn Martin Show

Is A Nose Job Or Tummy Tuck Right For Your Teenager?

Plastic surgery in the past was an option most often associated with adults, but the number of teenagers undergoing plastic surgery is trending upward.

Nearly 230,000 cosmetic procedures were performed on patients from the ages of 13 to 19 in 2017, according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Doctors say part of the reason is due to the social media explosion, but they add that it’s also to fix a feature that makes teens a target of bullying, or to address a health need. Parents can be faced with a quandary: Is the type of plastic surgery their teen wants appropriate or safe for their age?

“It’s very important that a parent know their child’s motive for plastic surgery and that they consult with the surgeon to ensure they are age-appropriate for the particular procedure,” says Dr. Dennis Schimpf,
a plastic surgeon, author of Finding Beauty: Think, See And Feel Beautiful, and founder of Sweetgrass Plastic Surgery (www.sweetgrassplasticsurgery.com).
“The family needs to be aware of the risks involved and be honest about why they are seeking the surgery. Is it because their child wants to look like a movie or TV star, compete with their appearance on social media, or because they’re getting teased at school?

“Parents and the surgeon must determine the psychological and social impact the teen is feeling and factor that into the equation.”

Dr. Schimpf can discuss when certain types of plastic surgery are appropriate for a teenager and when they are not.



Finding Beauty by Dr. Dennis Schimpf is Featured in The National Examiner



Dr. Schimpf Interviews with The Frankie Boyer Show

How Can You Turn Back The Clock On Your Aging Face?

Of the many new year’s resolutions people make, ways to restore vigor and feel younger are doable. But actually
looking younger is a tougher challenge. Joining a gym or sticking to a smarter diet can make us healthier and change the look of our bodies, but our face often gives away our age – or even makes us look older than we are.

How can we turn back the clock on our aging face?

“Women and men ages 45 to 65 really start to notice a difference in their skin when they look in the mirror,” says Dr. Dennis Schimpf, author of Finding Beauty: Think, See And Feel Beautiful, and founder of Sweetgrass Plastic Surgery. (www.sweetgrassplasticsurgery.com).

“Healthy living makes them feel great on the inside, but on the outside, the years can take a toll.”



Dr. Dennis Schimpf interviews with Rockhouse Style

Many Americans Don’t Like How They Look, But The Quest For Beauty Is More Than Skin-Deep, Surgeon Says

Are you happy with your appearance? If the answer is no, you are hardly alone.

A study conducted at Chapman University and published in the journal Body Image found that about half of women and men were not satisfied with their appearance. Furthermore, overall life satisfaction was strongly linked to the level of confidence one has in their looks.

While many people cite being overweight as their main appearance issue, others are frustrated by general aging. Both have driven the upswing in gym memberships and cosmetic surgeries. Dennis Schimpf, a plastic surgeon, says improving a physical flaw can become a quest to find “inner beauty” – and confidence – as well.

“Many people really aren’t confident in their own skin,” says Schimpf, author of Finding Beauty: Think, See And Feel Beautiful, and founder of Sweetgrass Plastic Surgery (www.sweetgrassplasticsurgery.com). “It’s often because different stages of life have different impacts on our body, our appearance, and how we feel about ourselves.

“The definition of beauty changes over time, but ultimately, you can’t just think it or see it; it also has to be felt. Not everyone needs plastic surgery nor is it going to fix every person’s life. But it can help improve a person’s sense of well-being.”

Schimpf can discuss for your listeners how people can test to see how confident they are with their bodies, why some people seek change for a physical flaw, and why others choose to live with it.

Listen to the show here:



Dr. Schimpf Interviews with The Mike Brooks Show on KVCU

Nov. 16, 2018: How Can You Turn Back The Clock On Your Aging Face?

Listen to the interview:



Dr. Schimpf Talks to Frankie Boyer about ‘Finding Beauty’ on Biz Talk Radio

Are You Uncomfortable In Your Own Skin?

“Many Americans Don’t Like How They Look, But The Quest For Beauty Is More Than Skin-Deep,” Surgeon Says.

Listen to the interview:

 



VIVE: FDA Warning Letter Should Weed-Out Imposters and Benefit VIVE

Aug 2, 2018

On July 30th FDA issued a Safety Communications letter warning against the use of “Energy-Based Devices to Perform Vaginal ‘Rejuvenation’ of Vaginal Cosmetic Procedures”. The purpose of the letter is to “alert patients and health care providers that the use of energy-based devices to perform vaginal “rejuvenation,” cosmetic vaginal procedures, or non-surgical vaginal procedures to treat symptoms related to menopause, urinary incontinence, or sexual function may be associated with serious adverse events. The safety and effectiveness of energy-based devices for treatment of these conditions has not been established.” Read the full article on Yahoo Finance.



SWEETGRASS PLASTIC SURGERY Golfer w/ Updated Text 08-09-17

Aug 1, 2017